Two kinds by amy tan essay conclusion

"You see, we're running into the problem of gang activity more and more; it's not like the old days when even the Mob had some decency. The gangs we're running into today are vicious , far beyond anything organized crime ever did. From your record, you seem to have a peculiar talent for spotting trouble, and dealing with it effectively - particularly the kind of trouble that we're running into with the gangs. Most of your military experience was dealing with the kind of people that we're having to deal with now, and we need to learn how you do it. So my function, first and foremost, is to learn that, so that we can share your knowledge and skills with our agents.

Well, as you all know, Amy went through some watery perils in Agent X, which resulted in her not wanting to ever do a watery peril scene ever again. In fact, Amy and Jac were discussing JUSTINE recently, and the probability of a wheel torture came up... Jac suggested setting up a torture where at the turn of the wheel Amy and Mila would go through water. Amy was not very thrilled with the idea. She's already considering being suspended by her ankles in one very difficult scene, she will not be alone suspended there, Mila will be close by, I heard, so... being put through a watery torture is not something she wants to be looking forward to. So, she'll need some convincing.

The same was true with word analogies, pairs of words in which you were supposed to find some sort of logical, semantic relationship -- for example, "Sunset is to nightfall as is to ." And here you would be presented with a list of four possible pairs, one of which showed the same kind of relationship: red is to stoplight, bus is to arrival, chills is to fever, yawn is to boring: Well, I could never think that way. I knew what the tests were asking, but I could not block out of my mind the images already created by the first pair, "sunset is to nightfall"--and I would see a burst of colors against a darkening sky, the moon rising, the lowering of a curtain of stars. And all the other pairs of words --red, bus, stoplight, boring--just threw up a mass of confusing images, making it impossible for me to sort out something as logical as saying: "A sunset precedes nightfall" is the same as "a chill precedes a fever." The only way I would have gotten that answer right would have been to imagine an associative situation, for example, my being disobedient and staying out past sunset, catching a chill at night, which turns into feverish pneumonia as punishment, which indeed did happen to me.

To Jing-mei's mother, America is the Land of Opportunity. She has high hopes that her daughter will be a great success as a prodigy. She's not precisely sure where her daughter's talents lie, but she is sure that her daughter possesses great ability — it is simply a matter of finding the right avenue for Jing-mei's talents. First, Mrs. Woo tries to mold her daughter into a child actress, but that doesn't work. Then she tries intellectual tests clipped from popular magazines. Jing-mei doesn't show promise in this area, either. Finally, Mrs. Woo hits upon the answer: Jing-mei will be a piano virtuoso.

Two kinds by amy tan essay conclusion

two kinds by amy tan essay conclusion

To Jing-mei's mother, America is the Land of Opportunity. She has high hopes that her daughter will be a great success as a prodigy. She's not precisely sure where her daughter's talents lie, but she is sure that her daughter possesses great ability — it is simply a matter of finding the right avenue for Jing-mei's talents. First, Mrs. Woo tries to mold her daughter into a child actress, but that doesn't work. Then she tries intellectual tests clipped from popular magazines. Jing-mei doesn't show promise in this area, either. Finally, Mrs. Woo hits upon the answer: Jing-mei will be a piano virtuoso.

Media:

two kinds by amy tan essay conclusiontwo kinds by amy tan essay conclusiontwo kinds by amy tan essay conclusiontwo kinds by amy tan essay conclusion