Peter singer abortion essay

Two, the functional view of persons does not fit certain intuitions about persons. For example, if you had a cat that couldn’t purr, couldn’t chase mice, and couldn’t climb trees, you wouldn’t say that your cat isn’t a feline (though you should if you define "feline" in terms of function). Instead, you would say that your cat is a cat that can’t purr, chase mice, or climb trees. [39] In the same way, if you know a human that can’t think rationally (like a fetus, or a person under a general anesthesia), you shouldn’t say that this human isn’t a person, but that this is a person who (at the moment) can’t think rationally. In light of these reasons, the functional view of persons should be rejected.

Some authors claim that the talk of moral rights and moral obligations is an old never-ending tale. There are no "moral rights" or "moral obligations" per se ; at least, in the sense that there are also moral rights and moral obligations apart from legal rights and legal obligations. There is no higher ethical authority which may enforce a specific moral demand. Rights and obligations rest on law. According to ethics, one should better say "moral agreements" (for example, Gauthier). The proponents claim that moral agreements do have a similar status to legal rights and legal obligations but stress that no person has an enforceable demand to have her moral rights prevail over others. The suitability is the essential aspect of the metaphysics of rights and obligations. Only the formal constraint establishes rights and obligations within a given society (for example, Hobbes); the informal constraint within a given society - though it may be stronger – is not able to do so. Without a court of first instance there are no rights and obligations. Only by using the legal system is one able to establish specific moral rights and specific moral obligations. Those authors claim that there are no absolute moral rights and moral obligations which are universally valid; moral agreements are always subjective and relative . Hence, there are also no (absolute) moral rights which the fetus (embryo, conceptus, or zygote) may call for. The only solution may be that the survival of the fetus rests on the will of the human beings in a given moral society. According to their view, it is only plausible to argue that an abortion is morally reprehensible if the people in a given society do have a common interest not to abort and make a moral agreement which is enforced by law.

The concept of brain death does not seek to promote the notion that there is more than one form of death. Rather, this specific terminology relates to a particular state, within a sequence of events, that constitutes the death of an individual. Thus brain death means the irreversible cessation of all the vital activity of the brain (the cerebral hemispheres and the brain stem). This involves an irreversible loss of function of the brain cells and their total, or near total, destruction. The brain is dead and the functioning of the other organs is maintained directly and indirectly by artificial means. This state results solely and specifically from the use of modern medical techniques and, with only rare exceptions, it can only be maintained for a limited time. …

Our specification offers a comprehensive range of options which enables teachers to design a course that reflects their specialism and will engage students. A wide choice of topics is offered for study in the areas of ethics, philosophy of religion, the world religions, aspects of Christianity, religion and art, religion and contemporary society. The specification is designed to be flexible and to allow teachers and students either to focus on one area of Religious Studies, thus ensuring coherence, or to undertake a broader study of religion through the selection of a variety of topics which complement each other.

Peter singer abortion essay

peter singer abortion essay

Our specification offers a comprehensive range of options which enables teachers to design a course that reflects their specialism and will engage students. A wide choice of topics is offered for study in the areas of ethics, philosophy of religion, the world religions, aspects of Christianity, religion and art, religion and contemporary society. The specification is designed to be flexible and to allow teachers and students either to focus on one area of Religious Studies, thus ensuring coherence, or to undertake a broader study of religion through the selection of a variety of topics which complement each other.

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