Narrative essay on hurricane katrina

The purpose of a narrative report is to describe something. Many students write narrative reports thinking that these are college essays or papers. While the information in these reports is basic to other forms of writing, narrative reports lack the "higher order thinking" that essays require. Thus narrative reports do not, as a rule, yield high grades for many college courses. A basic example of a narrative report is a "book report" that outlines a book; it includes the characters, their actions, possibly the plot, and, perhaps, some scenes. That is, it is a description of "what happens in the book." But this leaves out an awful lot.

“If I had superpowers, I would build a house for every homeless in the world. I would go back in time and have a talk with Hitler, or even better, I would just stop the world from falling apart. I would help scientists find the cure for cancer and adopt all the orphans to take them home with me. What would you do if you had superpowers?” A strong, yet warming scenario. A story that indirectly portrays the writer, talking about life principles, catastrophic events, issues that this world is facing. Ending the paragraph with a question is a fantastic way to involve the audience and build a relationship with it. This way you connect with people that share the same values while creating an imaginary dialogue. Other ideas:

Narrative essay on hurricane katrina

narrative essay on hurricane katrina

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