Murray rothbard essays

Rothbard was critical of monetarist economist Milton Friedman . In a polemic entitled "Milton Friedman Unraveled", he maligned Friedman as a "statist", a "favorite of the establishment", a friend of and "apologist" for Richard Nixon , and a "pernicious influence" on public policy. [56] [57] Rothbard said that libertarians should scorn rather than celebrate Friedman's academic prestige and political influence. Noting that Rothbard has "been nasty to me and my work", Friedman responded to Rothbard's criticism by calling him a "cult builder and a dogmatist." [58]

As for your response about Free Markets and Free Trade (I do not wish to turn this into a spamfest); I find some of the points you raise to be dubious. Yes there were communist infiltrators into the US who used their version of a ‘free trade’ system to advocate the damaging of US exports, manufacturing, and goods, but all of the systems these subversives and traitors advocated was more akin to a form of Anarcho-Capitalism than Classical Economics, Classical Liberalism, or Libertarianism-based Free Markets. I could point you in the direction of American economic thinkers like Milton Friedman and Thomas Sowell who did advocate Free Market Capitalism and Free Trade with reasonable amounts of regulations, and who have in turn heavily criticized Communist and Socialist economic theories of these very shady individuals you list. Friedman has also pointed out that Keynesian economic ideas work well in a time of crisis (such as the Depression), but ultimately have led to hyper-inflation (post-WW2 period), and to the bloated government the US is burdened with today that is economically unfeasible. None of these criticisms are unconstitutional in nature, nor did they intend for a backdoor for closet-authoritarians to infiltrate American society in the way you have presented, more so he has just illustrated the limited nature of Keynesian economic ideas. Friedman has also shown that the American economy, prior to the Great Depression, was very much akin to a Free Market Capitalist system; indeed the American economic school borrows from this concept on many levels.

In one famous instance during the mid-1950s Mises stormed out of a meeting of the Mont Pelerin Society, concerned that the young organization he helped create was falling under the sway of the Chicago school and corrupting its advocacy for uncompromising laissez-faire . One witness to this event was the rising Chicagoite star Milton Friedman, who years later recalled the story as proof of Mises’s intransigence. Mises’s adherence to principle was a strategic error in Friedman’s view, one that would cost Mises influence and money.

John Stuart Mill (United Kingdom, 1806–1873) is one of the first champions of modern "liberalism." As such, his work on political economy and logic helped lay the foundation for advancements in empirical science and public policy based on verifiable improvements. Strongly influenced by Bentham's utilitarianism , he disagrees with Kant's intuitive notion of right and formulates the "highest normative principle" of morals as: Actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness; wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness.

Murray rothbard essays

murray rothbard essays

John Stuart Mill (United Kingdom, 1806–1873) is one of the first champions of modern "liberalism." As such, his work on political economy and logic helped lay the foundation for advancements in empirical science and public policy based on verifiable improvements. Strongly influenced by Bentham's utilitarianism , he disagrees with Kant's intuitive notion of right and formulates the "highest normative principle" of morals as: Actions are right in proportion as they tend to promote happiness; wrong as they tend to produce the reverse of happiness.

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