Ethics mid term papers on the war in iraq

A central pledge of President Bill Clinton 's campaign was to reform the welfare system, adding changes such as work requirements for recipients. However, by 1994, the Clinton Administration appeared to be more concerned with pursuing a universal health care program. Gingrich accused Clinton of stalling on welfare, and proclaimed that Congress could pass a welfare reform bill in as little as 90 days. He insisted that the Republican Party would continue to apply political pressure to the President to approve their welfare legislation. [45]

In the first few centuries of Christianity, many Christians refused to engage in military combat. In fact, there were a number of famous examples of soldiers who became Christians and refused to engage in combat afterward. They were subsequently executed for their refusal to fight. [57] The commitment to pacifism and rejection of military service is attributed by Allman and Allman to two principles: "(1) the use of force (violence) was seen as antithetical to Jesus' teachings and service in the Roman military required worship of the emperor as a god which was a form of idolatry." [58]

Locke is careful to note that by “light of nature” he does not mean something like an “inward light” that is “implanted in man” and like a compass constantly leads human beings towards virtue. Rather, this light is to be understood as a kind of metaphor that indicates that truth can be attained by each of us individually by nothing more than the exercise of reason and the intellectual faculties ( Law , II: 123). Locke uses a comparison to precious metal mining to make this point clear. He acknowledges that some might say that his explanation of the discovery of the content of the law by the light of nature entails that everyone should always be in possession of the knowledge of this content. But, he notes, this is to take the light of nature as something that is stamped on the hearts on human beings, which is a mistake (see Law , III, 137-145). While the depths of the earth might contain veins of gold and silver, Locke says, this does not mean that everyone living on the stretch of land above those veins is rich ( Law , II: 135). Work must be done to dig out the precious metals in order to benefit from their value. Similarly, proper use must be made of the faculties we have in order to benefit from the certainty provided by the light of nature. Locke notes that we can come to know the law of nature, in a way, by tradition, which is to say by the testimony and instruction of other people. But it is a mistake to follow the law for any reason other than that we recognize its universal binding force. This can only be done by our own intellectual investigation ( Law , II: 129).

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"One investment house, in the aftershock of Procter & Gamble's lawsuit against Banker's Trust for less than full disclosure regarding risks in P&G's derivatives portfolio, sent all the marketers in its trading pit a written Code of Ethics People were told to read it and sign it. Everyone followed the instructions, or at least the second one. But the code became an instant joke. There was no training. No programs were launched to deal with gray areas. And there were no signals from management except those reinforcing business as usual. The employees saw the code for what it was - some legal ass-covering at a time of greater client scrutiny. Whatever the intent, reactions suggest that individuals, rather than being more ethical in their practices, were just that much more cynical that the ethical commitment of the company was for real. An ethical orientation deserves to be woven into strategy precisely because of the unpredictability of the business world. Since strategy cannot adequately prepare people for all eventualities, ethics can at least provide a belief structure to guide the creation of solutions and the realization of new opportunities. Gael M. McDonald, an associate professor of management at the Asia International Open University in Hong Kong, provides a different angle on the often used Tylenol recall to make this point. Johnson & Johnson is justly celebrated for pulling Tylenol off store shelves after several people in Chicago died when pills were tampered with. Students of the crisis point to J&J's fifty-year-old Credo as the moral inspiration for the decision. But, as McDonald writes, the reality was both more subtle and more powerful than that. "James Burke, chairman and CEO of Tylenol (J&J) at the time, has an interesting view of what happened. Burke is on record as saying that the $100-million recall decision never happened, because in reality there was never just one decision. According to Burke, dozens of people had to make literally hundreds of decisions, and then had to make them work. But by making the hundreds of decisions that led to the recall, Johnson and Johnson regained their market." Strategy could not have foreseen such a tragic eventuality, but the moral sense pervading the company allowed people to participate by their decisions in creating ad hoc the most compelling strategy of all."
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Ethics mid term papers on the war in iraq

ethics mid term papers on the war in iraq

[...]
"One investment house, in the aftershock of Procter & Gamble's lawsuit against Banker's Trust for less than full disclosure regarding risks in P&G's derivatives portfolio, sent all the marketers in its trading pit a written Code of Ethics People were told to read it and sign it. Everyone followed the instructions, or at least the second one. But the code became an instant joke. There was no training. No programs were launched to deal with gray areas. And there were no signals from management except those reinforcing business as usual. The employees saw the code for what it was - some legal ass-covering at a time of greater client scrutiny. Whatever the intent, reactions suggest that individuals, rather than being more ethical in their practices, were just that much more cynical that the ethical commitment of the company was for real. An ethical orientation deserves to be woven into strategy precisely because of the unpredictability of the business world. Since strategy cannot adequately prepare people for all eventualities, ethics can at least provide a belief structure to guide the creation of solutions and the realization of new opportunities. Gael M. McDonald, an associate professor of management at the Asia International Open University in Hong Kong, provides a different angle on the often used Tylenol recall to make this point. Johnson & Johnson is justly celebrated for pulling Tylenol off store shelves after several people in Chicago died when pills were tampered with. Students of the crisis point to J&J's fifty-year-old Credo as the moral inspiration for the decision. But, as McDonald writes, the reality was both more subtle and more powerful than that. "James Burke, chairman and CEO of Tylenol (J&J) at the time, has an interesting view of what happened. Burke is on record as saying that the $100-million recall decision never happened, because in reality there was never just one decision. According to Burke, dozens of people had to make literally hundreds of decisions, and then had to make them work. But by making the hundreds of decisions that led to the recall, Johnson and Johnson regained their market." Strategy could not have foreseen such a tragic eventuality, but the moral sense pervading the company allowed people to participate by their decisions in creating ad hoc the most compelling strategy of all."
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